Maine Hometown Careers

Come Home to a Maine Municipal Career, and Reap Benefits Beyond Your Paycheck.

Contact towns and cities near you about available jobs, today!

If you’re making a career change, moving back to Maine, or just starting out after school, consider a Hometown Career at a town or city near you.

There are hundreds of positions in municipal government that allow you to work with a close-knit team, with all the recreational and cultural opportunities Maine is famous for. Chances are, you’ll make a real impact on the lives of friends, family and neighbors from the very start.

To start, call nearby towns or cities to check out the wide range of municipal careers available right now, search our listings, or learn more about the many types of work available, including how to get qualified.

A Career At A Maine Town Or City Could Be The Perfect Choice For You — Fulfilling, Rewarding, Secure And Close To Home.
  • A Career At A Maine Town Or City Could Be The Perfect Choice For You - Fulfilling, Rewarding, Secure And Close To Home.

    A Career At A Maine Town Or City Could Be The Perfect Choice For You - Fulfilling, Rewarding, Secure And Close To Home.

    MAINE HOMETOWN CAREERS

  • "You Can Make a Positive Impact on Your Community, and Enjoy a Quality of Life Second to None."

    AUDRA CALER-BELL, TOWN MANAGER, CAMDEN

  • “I Take Great Pride in the Job That I’m Doing, and the Community Recognizes That.”

    “I Take Great Pride in the Job That I’m Doing, and the Community Recognizes That.”

    SAM QUINTANA, POLICE & SCHOOL RESOURCE OFFICER, GARDINER

  • “You Get a Lot of Benefits the Private Sector May Not Offer.”

    “You Get a Lot of Benefits the Private Sector May Not Offer.”

    KEEGAN BALLARD, CODE ENFORCEMENT OFFICER, AUGUSTA

  • “It’s a Very Rewarding Feeling to Know That You Are Serving People in Your Community.”

    “It’s a Very Rewarding Feeling to Know That You Are Serving People in Your Community.”

    PHYLLIS RAND, WATER QUALITY COORDINATOR, GREATER AUGUSTA UTILITY DISTRICT

What's That Job?

Learn more about careers in Maine Towns and Cities by browsing real world examples below:

Assessor / Appraiser

Nature of the work:

The assessor provides the financial underpinning for everything that municipal government does. This person appraises real estate and personal property for the purposes of tax assessment.

Reports to:

The assessor typically reports to the town or city manager, head of the municipal Finance Department or directly to the Chair of the Select Board.

Skills required:

Strong customer-service skills, as this person works with citizens, business owners and state and federal agencies. Thorough knowledge of local ordinance and states laws related to tax assessment. Competence with geography, maps, computers and statistics.

Qualifications:

Attainable through outside agencies, Certified Maine Assessor designation is often required. Some municipalities prefer experience in the building trades and possibly the completion of college-level courses.

Physical demands:

The job is not physically demanding, but mobility and the ability to operate some tools can be important. Nighttime hours and some outside work are typical.


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Evan Hazelton, Assessor/ Appraiser, Lewiston
Evan Hazelton, Assessor/ Appraiser, Lewiston
Evan Hazelton, Assessor/ Appraiser, Lewiston
Evan Hazelton, Assessor/ Appraiser, Lewiston

Clerk (Town / City)

Nature of the work:

The municipal clerk is perhaps the key local government job in Maine, because every town and city has one – or more. The municipal clerk is often the human face of town or city hall, working at the counter, renewing auto registrations and dog licenses, and running elections.

Reports to:

Town or city manager, or the select board or council.

Skills required:

Organizational skills and attention to detail are musts, as this position supervises and Computer competence is required. Oral and written communication skills often come into play.

Qualifications:

A two- or four-year college degree is preferred, but not always required. New clerks typically are expected to attain certification through the clerks’ professional association.

Physical demands:

Not super-strenuous, but night meeting attendance is expected and long hours are the norm during elections.

By the numbers:

Virtually all 490 municipalities in Maine employ a full- or part-time clerk. Clerks’ offices in larger municipalities have several people on staff.


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Emily Scully, City Clerk, South Portland
Emily Scully, City Clerk, South Portland
Emily Scully, City Clerk, South Portland
Emily Scully, City Clerk, South Portland

Code Enforcement Officer

Nature of the work:

The CEO position plays a key role in planning and zoning, and making sure that building projects are done legally and meet certain safety standards.

Reports to:

Typically reports to a town or city manager or a first select person. Also has reporting responsibilities to the town Planning Board and Board of Appeals (planning).

Skills required:

A strong interest in, or knowledge of, the construction field is vital. Oral and written communication skills are important, too, as this person has extensive contact with the public. Ability to work well under pressure is also desirable.

Qualifications:

Some municipalities prefer applicants with two-or four-year college degrees. State law requires that Code Enforcement Officers complete required training and certification standards within 12 months of starting the job.

Physical demands:

Persons in this job are often in the field, on construction job sites or in completed buildings. The ability to operate a motor vehicle, equipment and certain tools is important.


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Keegen Ballard, Code Enforcement Officer, Augusta
Keegen Ballard, Code Enforcement Officer, Augusta
Keegen Ballard, Code Enforcement Officer, Augusta
Keegen Ballard, Code Enforcement Officer, Augusta

Dispatcher / Communications Specialist

Nature of the work:

The dispatcher receives and handles public safety calls and requests, including emergency calls via the 911 network.

Reports to:

Dispatch supervisor.

Qualifications:

A high school degree or equivalent to start. Professional certifications must be achieved and maintained after employment begins.

Skills required:

Attention to detail is important, as is an ability to think quickly and handle pressure. Punctuality is also needed, and the ability to work well with others.

Physical demands:

The ability to hear and perform well under stress.

Municipal perspective:

Dispatchers, also known as "communications specialists," work for municipalities, counties and regional governmental entities.


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Hiram Delrio, Communications Supervisor, Portland
Hiram Delrio, Communications Supervisor, Portland
Hiram Delrio, Communications Supervisor, Portland
Hiram Delrio, Communications Supervisor, Portland

Firefighter, EMT, Paramedic

Nature of the work:

These first responders keep people safe and assist citizens during times of need, providing on-scene medical services and responding to accidents and natural disasters. There is strong demand for job candidates in this field. Professional advancement is possible throughout the State.

Reports to:

Through the fire-rescue chain of command to a fire lieutenant, captain, fire chief or EMS department head.

Skills required:

Must be able to respond quickly to unanticipated events and perform well under pressure. Also important: strong interpersonal and speaking skills, computer competency, and working well with others.

Qualifications:

High school degree or equivalency to start; later, training in fire suppression, EMT-basic and paramedic-level certification. Continuing education is expected.

Physical demands:

Depending on exact job, can include operation of fire-suppression equipment, medical equipment and emergency response vehicles.


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Breeanna Zoidis, Firefighter & Paramedic, Biddeford
Breeanna Zoidis, Firefighter & Paramedic, Biddeford
Breeanna Zoidis, Firefighter & Paramedic, Biddeford
Breeanna Zoidis, Firefighter & Paramedic, Biddeford

General Assistance Administrator

Nature of the work:

This is a key customer-service position where the employee meets with, interviews and makes recommendations about people who seek public assistance.

Reports to:

GA Manager, Finance Director or Town or City Manager.

Qualifications:

A college degree in social work, public administration or career experience equivalent may be preferred. GA training is important, but often comes with time in the job. GA rules change regularly; ongoing training is expected.

Skills required:

Three key skills are the abilities to work independently, with patience and to maintain strict confidentiality. Strong working knowledge of state statutes and state and local GA guidelines is important.

Physical demands:

The ability to hear, see, walk and talk, along with decent keyboarding skills. The workplace is moderately quiet.

Municipal perspective:

Larger municipalities have full-time GA officers but many mid-size and smaller communities combine this position with other duties.


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Kristen Barth, General Assistance Administrator, Biddeford
Kristen Barth, General Assistance Administrator, Biddeford
Kristen Barth, General Assistance Administrator, Biddeford
Kristen Barth, General Assistance Administrator, Biddeford

Library Technician / Librarian

Nature of the work:

These are two different positions that provide essential services in municipal libraries such as planning library programs, patron assistance, purchasing adult and children’s materials, collection development, cataloging and technical assistance.

Reports to:

Head librarian or a library department head.

Skills required:

Strong customer-service, interpersonal and communication skills are paramount. Attention to detail is important. People entering this field should be comfortable with computers and technology.

Qualifications:

A technician position may require a two-year college degree and/or comparable library experience. Full-time librarians may be required to have Master’s degrees.

Physical demands:

The employee is expected to reach with hands and arms, talk and hear. The job may require an ability to climb, kneel and lift up to 25 pounds. Reasonable accommodations may be made to enable people with disabilities to attain these positions.

By the numbers:

Typically, only mid-sized and larger municipalities in Maine have full-time library staffs. Some libraries are municipal departments, while others operate as separate non-profits that receive substantial municipal funding.


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Mary Randall, Library Technician, Lewiston
Mary Randall, Library Technician, Lewiston
Mary Randall, Library Technician, Lewiston
Mary Randall, Library Technician, Lewiston

Manager (Town / City)

Nature of the work:

The town or city manager oversees all municipal duties and employees, ranging from budgeting and taxes to police and fire response—and much more.

Reports to:

An elected select board or council.

Skills required:

Effective communication and leadership skills, attention to detail, innate curiosity, the ability to multi-task, and a desire to truly listen.

Qualifications:

Most city and town managers have previous experience within municipal government or in the private sector. A college Bachelor’s degree, in a field such as Public Administration, is typical. Some cities and towns prefer a Master’s degree.

Physical demands:

While the work is not physically strenuous per se, hours can be long and irregular. Attendance at night meetings and weekend events is expected. If an emergency occurs, the municipal manager typically is an on-scene point person who helps make key decisions.

By the numbers:

There are more than 250 municipal managers, including assistant managers, in Maine.


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Audra Caler-bell, Town Manager, Camden
Audra Caler-bell, Town Manager, Camden
Audra Caler-bell, Town Manager, Camden
Audra Caler-Bell, Town Manager, Camden

Planner (Town / City)

Nature of the work:

This exciting and challenging profession helps to manage and direct land development and other changes within a community. The employee in this field has extensive interaction with the public, businesses and municipal staff.

Reports to:

Director of Planning and/or Economic Development; Town or City Manager.

Qualifications:

A college degree in Urban Planning, Public Administration or a related field may be required.

Skills required:

Organization and customer-service skills are paramount. The ability to see both sides of an issue is important. GIS and other forms of technology constantly evolve in this dynamic line of work.

Physical demands:

This is typically office work. Planners also spend time in their communities analyzing things. The ability to carry up to 25 pounds can be necessary. Night meeting attendance is expected.

By the numbers:

Full-time planners tend to work for midsize and larger municipalities. Positions with county, regional and state governmental entities also exist.


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Linda Johns, Planner, Brewer
Linda Johns, Planner, Brewer
Linda Johns, Planner, Brewer
Linda Johns, Planner, Brewer

Police Officer

Nature of the work:

Patrol officers are highly visible in their communities. Citizens count on police officers to keep them safe and enforce laws fairly. The job can be exciting at times, but is also demanding. Offers excellent opportunities for advancement statewide.

Reports to:

Depending on department size, a sergeant or the chief.

Skills required:

Many and varied: problem solving; strong oral communication; excellent driving; proficiency with computers (in vehicle and office), radio equipment, and firearms.

Qualifications:

Officers must attain and maintain active certification from the Maine Criminal Justice Academy. Some municipalities prefer two- or fouryear college degrees. A valid state Class C driver’s license is required, as is continuing education.

Physical demands:

Good vision, hearing, depth perception and the ability to work long hours, often without rest. Officers may need to able to lift 100 pounds, run, climb, and work outside, even in extreme weather, for long stretches of time.


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Dustin Dow, Police Officer, Bangor
Dustin Dow, Police Officer, Bangor
Dustin Dow, Police Officer, Bangor
Dustin Dow, Police Officer, Bangor

Tax Collector / Treasurer

Nature of the work:

This job title is general. In some cases, the municipal Treasurer also serves as Tax Collector. In some cases, a town manager may also be the municipal treasurer and tax collector. In larger municipalities, Finance Departments may employ several people full-time in these positions.

Reports to:

Finance Director, Manager, Council or Select Board.

Qualifications:

A two- or four-year finance or business degree may be required, but isn’t always. Experience with government accounting may be preferred.

Skills required:

Knowledge of statutes and guidelines that govern tax collection and cash handling. Attention to detail is imperative. Customer-service skills are important. Experience with technology and software such as Excel may be preferred.

Physical demands:

Walking, talking, hearing and the ability to read are important physical skills. Work hours can include night meetings.

By the numbers:

These are positions that all 490 municipalities have, although some are held by part-time employees or by full-time employees wearing “multiple hats.”


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Tracie York, Tax Collector, Lincoln
Jordan Miles, Treasurer, Lebanon
Jordan Miles, Treasurer, Lebanon
Tracie York, Tax Collector, Lincoln
Jordan Miles, Treasurer, Lebanon

Truck Driver / Equipment Operator

Nature of the work:

These positions are essential to constructing, maintaining and improving roads and other infrastructure in Maine towns and cities. People in these jobs operate high-tech snow plows, dump trucks, solid waste vehicles and other equipment.

Reports to:

Public Works director or supervisor.

Skills required:

The ability to work independently is critical. Good driving skills, alertness and the ability to follow verbal and written instructions are also important.

Qualifications:

A valid commercial driver’s license is required. Training for that may be supported by the municipality. A high school diploma or equivalency is expected.

Physical demands:

Exertion and manual work is expected in this field, as is a certain level of physical coordination and the ability to drive, operate equipment and watch gauges and dials simultaneously. Employees must meet drug and alcohol requirements.

By the numbers:

These are common, yet in-demand, municipal positions, particularly among mid-sized and large municipalities. Small towns may use private contractors for this work, which is another opportunity for employment.


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Manny Proctor, Public Works, Augusta
Manny Proctor, Public Works, Augusta
Manny Proctor, Public Works, Augusta
Manny Proctor, Public Works, Augusta

Water / Wastewater

Nature of the work:

If you like to be outside, and do meaningful work that directly affects a community’s quality of life, this career may be for you. The employee in this field is a multi-tasker who is comfortable learning about the mechanics of water and wastewater systems, the science behind providing pure, safe drinking water and safeguarding public health.

Reports to:

Transmission/Distribution Supervisor, Chief Operator of a Water or Wastewater Treatment facility. Could report to others, depending on specific assignment.

Qualifications:

A high school diploma is required. Associate or relevant bachelor’s collegelevel degree will help with advancement. An apprenticeship/internship is standard, with length up to six months.

Skills required:

Key attributes are the ability to work independently and in a team environment, comfort in using computer systems and a willingness to learn.

Physical demands:

A level of good health and fitness is important. Employees may need to obtain a Class A or B (CDL) driver’s license within six months, depending on assignment.

By the numbers:

These positions are in high demand. They generally center in midsized and larger communities, including at places like the Portland Water District, which serves many cities and towns in southern Maine.


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Water / Wastewater System Operator
Water / Wastewater System Operator

Watch Hometown Stories

Watch and listen to these real Mainers talk about their hometown careers:

About Maine Hometown Careers

About Maine Hometown Careers

Phyllis Rand, Water Quality Coordinator, Greater Augusta Utility District

Phyllis Rand, Water Quality Coordinator, Greater Augusta Utility District

Manny Proctor, Public Works, Augusta

Manny Proctor, Public Works, Augusta

Sam Quintana, Police & School Resource Officer, Gardiner

Sam Quintana, Police & School Resource Officer, Gardiner

Jordan Miles, Treasurer, Lebanon

Jordan Miles, Treasurer, Lebanon

Emily Scully, City Clerk, South Portland

Emily Scully, City Clerk, South Portland

Audra Caler-Bell, Town Manager, Camden

Audra Caler-Bell, Town Manager, Camden

Keegen Ballard, Code Enforcement Officer, Augusta

Keegen Ballard, Code Enforcement Officer, Augusta

Breeanna Zoidis, Firefighter & Paramedic, Biddeford

Breeanna Zoidis, Firefighter & Paramedic, Biddeford

Dustin Dow, Police Officer, Bangor

Dustin Dow, Police Officer, Bangor

Sam Quintana, Police & School Resource Officer, Gardiner (En Español)

Sam Quintana, Police & School Resource Officer, Gardiner (En Español)



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